Blog Archives

Five Ways To Prevent Sports Injuries

by Paul Ingraham

Weekend warriors and a lot of amateur athletes tend to believe that injury prevention is pretty much all about having a stretching regimen, and they are usually feeling guilty about not doing it enough. If I had a buck for every time I’ve heard someone say, just before a game of ultimate, “I should really do some stretching” … well, heck, I could afford to play ultimate for a living.

Lucky for them, they aren’t really missing anything important. As established elsewhere, stretching doesn’t really work (see Quite a Stretch) for the things people think it does, and it is particularly useless at preventing injury. Here are five ways to prevent injury that are a much better use of your time …

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Are Kettlebells Safe?

Question:

Are Kettlebells safe?  I’m curious to hear your thoughts.

RTS:

Kettlebells by themselves have never hurt anybody. They don’t explode and spew shrapnel. They don’t roll down the street and squash babies in their strollers. They are inanimate objects that sit on the floor/rack and have never intentionally with premeditation attacked a single soul. It’s what people DO with kettlebells that may be the benefit… or the detriment, as is often the case!

Most so-called experts that devise the exercises have no clue about the body (joint tolerances) nor the device (moment arm and inertial properties) and therefore, in an attempt to make a “rock’n workout” often sacrifice their followers along the way. Read the rest of this entry

“Isolated” vs. Integrated: Motor Learning Reality (Transfer)

“The present research was designed to investigate the mechanisms how ageing and orthopaedics disorders interact in determining and recovering from an impaired fast STS movement. Our findings verify the hypotheses that, in elders with motor impairments consequent to orthopaedic disorders (MIE), ageing and functional impairment reduce the performance in a successful fast sit-to-stand (STS) movement and that increasing knee extensor muscle strength improve this capability. On the basis of the comparison with healthy elderly subjects, we found that trunk bending momentum and knee extensor muscle strength are significant determinants of the fast STS capability in MIE as well as in healthy elders.”
M. Bernardi, et. al, 2004
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